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Ann Faraone EdD Biography

Director of Education Services

American Association of Caregiving Youth

Ann FaraoneWith over four decades of experience in the field of education, Ann Faraone, EdD began her career as a teacher in NYC. She has also been the Program Director for the NYS Department of Education, Assistant Dean of the Graduate School of Education & Human Services at St. John’s University, and as a Principal in NY & FL. When The School District of Palm Beach County created the Department of Student Intervention Services to provide programs and support for the most vulnerable students, Ann was appointed as Director. This extra level of support targeted homeless, foster, caregiving youth, pregnant/parenting teens and those in the juvenile justice and/or the alternative education system. Recognizing the logical link of health related issues, Ann supervised all health, wellness & nursing services in the schools. Raising awareness of the trauma and its ripple effects on these students, as well as collaborating with a multitude of agencies, created opportunities for students, many without parental advocacy, thus mitigating the barriers they were facing daily.  Ann believes in “leaving no stone unturned for students” and has created a culture of cooperation and collaboration between agencies, who share a common client—the student & their families. Understanding that no one group can eradicate the multiple barriers faced by many students, particularly those of color and those living in poverty, the common sense approach was one of  leveraging resources, & joining forces to “invest in the human infrastructure” in our community. Ann continues the work of advocating for the most vulnerable youth through consulting on educational issues for national and local non-profits, school districts & parent organizations. 

U.S. and International Caregiving Youth Facts

 

  • There are an estimated 1.3-1.4 million caregiving children ages 8-18 years old in the U.S. Of these, 38% provide care for a grandparent and 34% provide care for a parent - Young Caregivers in the U.S.; National Alliance for Caregiving (NAC) & United Hospital Fund, 2005.
     
  • Nationally, there are an estimated 36.5 million caregiving households in which 37% of participants (13.5 million) also had children under the age of 18 years living at home - Caregiving in the U.S; NAC/AARP, 2009.
     
  • Of 1,626 sixth grade students surveyed in five Palm Beach County middle schools in 2008, 563 are caregivers; 344 have significant caregiving responsibilities. Caregiving youth project survey results, 2009. www.aacy.org.
     
  • The 2000 U.S. Census shows that 6.1 million children live in a home with a grandparent. Census, 2008.
     
  • "Not every child gets 18 years of childhood. Some have to become responsible adults well before their bodies grow into maturity." How to help youth caregivers: Children caring for sick relatives need some attention of their own. Ryan. Contemporary Pediatrics, March 1, 2008.
     
  • "By 2006 there was only one dedicated initiative, the Caregiving Youth Project, in Boca Raton, Florida, compared with over 350 projects in the UK." Global perspectives on children's unpaid caregiving in the family: research and policy on young carers in the UK, Australia, the USA and Sub-Saharan Africa. Becker. Global Social Policy. 2007; 7: 23-50.
     
  • More than 25% of all public school children, grades 6-12 in Palm Beach County, incurred adverse effects on their education as a result of caregiving - What Works Survey Final Report. Miller, Bunker, & Kelley-Miller, 2003.
     
  • "The main reason why children undertake inappropriate caring roles is a lack of adequate support services for their ill/disabled relatives. If appropriate and adequate support services are not provided, most of the care and support required falls to family members." Statistical profiles of young carers. Centre for Child and Family Research. Evidence Issue 3; Aldridge & Becker, 2003.

 

American Association of Caregiving Youth Board of Directors

 

Board of Directors

2017-2018

Joe Kraus, Chair

Daniel Davidowitz, Vice Chair

Isabel Parrado, Secretary

Corey King, EdD-Treasurer 

Connie Siskowski, RN, PhD, President

Marcia Andrews

Mark Balsom, Esq 

Althea Ceasor

Gail Eagle

Rosie Iguanzo-Martin

Michael Miller

Daniel Polen

Joseph Pores

 

 

(Click on the member's name to read biography)


Fred Galland, the first AACY Chair,
who served from 2000 to 2011 passed away on March 31,2011. We will miss him.


 

Caregiving Youth Project - Non-Profit Affiliations with AACY

affiliates 

Caregiving Youth Project: Non-Profit Affiliations with AACY

The Caregiving Youth Project began in Palm Beach County, FL at Boca Raton Community Middle School located in Boca Raton in 2006. It identifies, recognizes and supports middle school students who are caring for ill, injured, elderly or disabled family members. From its inception, it has worked to integrate systems of healthcare, education and the community (body, mind and spirit) in order to form a firm foundation from which to deliver a comprehensive support system. The youth caregiver is our client and strengthening the family can reduce the burden on the child. The issues that caregiving youth face are beyond the purview of any one system. The Project's variety of needs-driven solutions and focused services are delivered in-school, out-of-school and at home. Examples of each include: In-school caregiver identification process, 6-8 week skills building/support groups, lunch and learn sessions throughout the year; Out-of-school Camp Treasure or Reunion Camp, fishing trip, YMCA-wellness day, Holiday Celebration; and At home consultation by a social worker with community linkages, tutoring/mentoring with community volunteers, and respite.

While we would like for all of our affiliates to be able to replicate the Caregiving Youth Project in its entirety, we realize that it is not always practical. All affiliates participate in reaching, supporting and strengthening caregiving youth so they can achieve success in school and in life. We have developed three types of affiliations with the American Association of Caregiving Youth that embody our organization’s values:

  1. Represents strength, love, energy, the heart of our work and it implements all foundational aspects of the Project utilizing a collaboration between healthcare, education and community partners and delivering services in-school, out-of-school and at home.

  2. Represents growth, renewal, harmony and it implements collaboration between at least two of the foundation systems and delivers support services through at least two of the categories.

  3. Represents importance, peace, steadfastness and its implementation focuses on the core of the Project - caregiving youth with specific services delivered to the youth through any one of the foundational systems.

 

Our first Caregiving Youth Institute Conference will be held on April 23, 2015 to educate healthcare professionals, educators, community professionals and legislators on the issues surrounding caregiving youth. http://cgyinstitute.org/events.html 

MENU OF SERVICES FOR AFFILIATES

 

AACY recognizes that just as caregiving youth and their families have individual needs, so do its non-profit affiliates.

The following services are included in the modest annual affiliation fee:

 

 

Start-Up Assistance

 

-Initial consultation and determination of synergy between AACY and the non-profit;

-Presentations to community stakeholders;

-Review of affiliate grant proposals and related activities designed for development of the non-profit’s Caregiving Youth Project;

-Skills Building/Support Group proprietary curriculum, evaluation and handouts;

-Camp Treasure, Continuing Care and Bereavement Transition handouts for caregiving youth;

-Communication with AACY staff to troubleshoot and/or provide recommendations to affiliate regarding specific client and/or development issues;

-Bi-annual review of progress and recommendations for process improvement.

 

 

Ongoing Assistance

 

-Use of AACY logo and the terms “in affiliation with” in the creation and printing of marketing collateral with the written approval of AACY in advance of printing;

-Utilization of the AACY toll free number and answering services for the non-profit clients and family, including referrals to the non-profit;

-E-distribution of “Treasure Talk” to clients and stakeholders of the non-profit as provided to AACY by the non-profit along with permission to use a print version for distribution by the non-profit to clients and stakeholders without email access;

-Monthly attendance via telephone at AACY team meetings;

-Attendance at AACY sponsored events;

-Introduction to media, research and publishing opportunities as they arise;

-Posting of AACY approved information about the non-profit on the AACY web site with links to local resources as supplied to AACY by the non-profit that will appear under the category of “Affiliates” at www.aacy.org

Additional services may be available for a fee or expense reimbursement. These services include but are not limited to data entry and analysis to determine the caregiving youth Level of Responsibility for eligibility and prioritization of youth and staff education.

 

Ann FaraoneThe Director of Educational Services, Ann Faraone, EdD is available to support affiliates with strategies to remove the barriers to education for caregiving youth.

Marissa Gart Biography

Marissa B. Gart, Esq. is an Associate Attorney with Feldman & Schneiderman, P.L. in Boca Raton, Florida.  Her area of practice is Family Law, including dissolution of marriage, alimony, child custody, child support, property settlement agreements, post and pre-nuptial agreements, and paternity.  Prior to joining Feldman & Schneiderman, P.L., she served as an Assistant Public Defender for Broward County, Florida where she defended indigent clients against state prosecution.  In 2010, she graduated from the University of Miami, School of Law where she received her Juris Doctorate; and in 2005, she graduated from the University of Michigan where she received a Bachelor of Arts in English.    Marissa is a Boca Raton native and is actively involved in the South Palm Beach County Chapter of Florida Association for Women Lawyers and the South Palm Beach County Bar Association. 

Caregiving Youth Project (CYP) of AACY

Problem: There were no organized U.S. support services for caregiving children and adolescents yet they, like their adult family caregiver counterparts, incur consequences from caregiving in their health, well-being, education, and in their lives.

Background of Evidence:  For more than a decade researchers in the U.K. and more recently in Australia have documented and addressed the issues surrounding "young carers". The first U.S. study, released in September 2005, documented that there are at least 1.3-1.4 million caregiving youth of whom 72% care for a grandparent or parent. Those most adversely affected live in single parent and lower income homes. In 2002, Palm Beach County research revealed a high prevalence of caregiving responsibilities among students as well as negative ramifications on their education. Among middle school students, those most affected were minority boys who attend Title I schools. Palm Beach County population demographics include a higher than U.S. norm older population, younger disabled, single parent households, prevalence of HIV/AIDS, grandparents as parents, and cultural/ethnic diversity all of which compounds and contributes to a high prevalence of family health and caregiving situations.
       
Project Description: In response to the issues and as a natural extension of their core services, what was VHFC established the first U.S. Caregiving Youth Project (CYP) with the objectives of education and awareness, research, and direct services.  At this time, the Caregiving Youth Partners' Project (CYPP) is creating an evaluation-based model among middle school student-caregivers to address caregiving ramifications including isolation and activity restrictions that may hinder their psychosocial, emotional, developmental, physical health, education opportunities, and well-being. The CYP offers in-school counseling, didactic and informal education, skills building, family evaluation to assure linkages to existing services, and sponsored activities including the CYP club as students progress to high school to increase caregiving children's satisfaction with life and decrease somatization, depression, anxiety, and poor coping strategies.

Project Objectives: The broad mission of the CYP is to return to caregiving youth some of their childhood back by identifying, educating, and supporting caregiving middle school students. Specifically, the CYP will: a) Increase awareness of caregiving youth issues throughout the Palm Beach County health and education communities; b) Identify and prioritize students in most need of services through survey and assessment; c) Reduce anxiety, depression and increase caregiving children's satisfaction with life through the provision of counseling, education, and support services including respite and sponsored activities; and d) Conduct in-home evaluations to link families with existing support services; and e) Build a replicable project model. 

Program Sustainability: The CYP has been working closely and cooperatively with the Safe Schools Program of the School District of Palm Beach County, the umbrella for drop-out prevention activities. The Silent Epidemic reports that among students who drop out of school for personal reasons, 22% do so to care for a family member. We will compare the drop out rate of students in a control group vs. those receiving CYP support. As a means of drop out prevention and associated dollars, with support, caregiving youth should be able to remain in school. 

Project Funding: The CYP in conjunction with the Schmidt Family Foundation and The Toppel Family Foundation worked to build a coalition of committed and pending funding partners including Palm Healthcare Foundaton, Gertrude E. Skelly Charitable Foundation, The Jim Moran Foundation, P.L. Dodge Foundation, John W. Henry Foundation, the Lattner Family Foundation, BankAtlantic Foundation and subsequently the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Local Initiative Funding Partners .

Since that time, other foundations have joined to support the CYP.

 


Subcategories

About Us
Article Count:
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Board of Directors
Article Count:
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Sidebar
Article Count:
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Affiliates

<H1>CAREGIVING YOUTH PROJECT - NONPROFIT AFFILIATIONS WITH AACY
</H1>
<P>The Caregiving Youth Project began in Palm Beach County, FL at Boca Raton Community Middle School located in Boca Raton in 2006.  It identifies, recognizes and supports middle school students who are caring for ill, injured, elderly or disabled family members.  From its inception, it has worked to integrate systems of healthcare, education and the community (body, mind and spirit) in order to form a firm foundation from which to deliver a comprehensive support system.  The youth caregiver is our client and strengthening the family can reduce the burden on the child.  The issues that caregiving youth face are beyond the purview of any one system.  The Project's variety of needs-driven solutions and focused services are delivered in-school, out-of-school and at home.  Examples of each include:  In-school > caregiver identification process, 6-8 week skills building/support groups, lunch and learn sessions throughout the year; Out-of-school > Camp Treasure or Reunion Camp, fishing trip, YMCA-wellness day, Holiday Celebration; and, At home > home consultation by a social worker with community linkages, tutoring/mentoring with community volunteers, and respite.
</P>
<P>While we would like for all of our affiliates to be able to replicate the Caregiving Youth Project in its entirety, we realize that it is not always practical.  All affiliates participate in reaching, supporting and strengthening caregiving youth so they can achieve success in school and in life.  We have developed three types of affiliations with the American Association of Caregiving Youth that embody the colors of our logo and reflect its symbolism:
</P>
<P><FONT COLOR="#FF0000">RED AFFILIATE</FONT> - represents strength, love, energy, the heart of our work and it implements all foundational aspects of the Project utilizing a collaboration between healthcare, education and community partners and delivering services in-school, out-of-school and at home.
</P>
<P><FONT COLOR="#008000">GREEN AFFILIATE</FONT> - represents growth, renewal, harmony and it implements collaboration between at least two of the foundation systems and delivers support services through at least two of the categories.
</P>
<P><FONT COLOR="#0000FF">BLUE AFFILIATE</FONT> - represents importance, peace, steadfastness and its implementation focuses on the core of the Project - caregiving youth with specific services delivered to the youth through any one of the foundational systems.
</P>
 

Article Count:
1

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Please help us financially so the hidden population of caregiving youth becomes visible and receives support to help them have success at school and in their lives!

I am a Teen Caregiver

 Resource Book  

I am a teen caregiver EditedReaders will get a frank description of the challenges faced by many teen caregivers. Teens who are immersed in this life already can find resources and organizations for support, as well as sound advice for coping in tough times. Check Library or buy at: Amazon  or Rosen Publisher

 

 

Small Connie
Connie Siskowski

As a child I took care of my Grandfather.
How I wish there had been an AACY for me then!

 

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